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 Dr. Bruno Glaser
 

 

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Food chemist, medical assistant

Assistant professor

 

University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth 

Universitätsstr. 30, 95447 Bayreuth 

++49-921-552254 

++49-921-552246 

 

bruno.glaser@uni-bayreuth.de


Teaching

SS 2002

Standortskundliches Geländepraktikum Burgund

Seminar Biozide

3 SWS

1 SWS

WS 2002/

2003

Projektübungen Bodenchemie und Bodenschutz

Vorbereitungsseminar zu Projektübungen

Seminar Bodenchemie und Bodenschutz: Physikochemische Grundlagen

Nachbereitungsseminar zum "Standortskundlichen Geländepraktikum Burgund" im SS2002

3 SWS

1 SWS

1 SWS

1 SWS

 

SS 2003

Standortskundliches Geländepraktikum Burgund

Seminar Biochemie der Bodensanierung

Praktikum Spezielle Arbeitstechniken

Bodenkundliche Geländeübungen

3 SWS

1 SWS

3 SWS

1 SWS

WS 2003/

2004

Projektübungen Bodenchemie und Bodenschutz

Vorbereitungsseminar zu Projektübungen

Bodenklassifikation

Nachbereitungsseminar zum "Standortskundlichen Geländepraktikum Burgund" im SS2003

3 SWS

1 SWS

1 SWS

1 SWS

 

Supervised Master and PhD theses

1996

Kunz Stefanie (Master thesis):
Stickstoff-Pools tropischer Böden: Eine vergleichende Studie von Oxisol und Terra Preta do Indio (Indianerschwarzerden)

1998

Führböter Maike (Master thesis):
Der Einfluß unterschiedlicher Landnutzung auf die organische Bodensubstanz in Nord-Tansania

2002

Schmitt, Jochen (Master thesis):
d13C einzelner CuO-Ligninphenole mittels GC-C-IRMS Kopplung - Optimierung von Geräteparametern und Anwendung bei geoökologischen Fragestellungen

2002

Andreas Manhart (Master thesis):
Postglaziale Klima- und Umweltänderungen in Ostafrika - Analysen von Seesedimenten aus den Bale Mountains

2002

Benker Angela (Master thesis):
blabla...

2003

Richter Merle (Master thesis):
Möglichkeiten und Grenzen der DNA-Analytik zur Rekonstruktion der Paläolandnutzung präkolumbischer Indianerschwarzerden (Terra Preta do Indio)

2003

Groß Simone (Master thesis):
Substanzspezifische
d13C-Analyse im Boden: Strategien zur Minimierung der Zugabe von Fremdkohlenstoff bei der Derivatisierung von organischen Molekülen

 

Projects

1996 - 1999

Properties and stability of soil organic matter in Red Indian Black Earths (Terra Preta) (DFG Gu 406/2-1,2)

1998 - 2000

Soil organic matter quantity and quality in mountain soils of the Alay Range, Kyrgyzia, affected by land use change

1999

Reconstruction of the Late Quaternary Glaciation of the Macha Khola valley (Gorkha Himal, Nepal)

2000 - 2002

Compound-specific isotope ratios of soil organic matter

(DFG Ze 154/46-1)

Since 2001

Evaluation of soil genesis and soil ertility of the Pamir mountains, Tajikistan

(DFG GL XY)

Since 2003

Assessing turnover rates of soil organic matter by means of compound-specific isotope ratios (d13C)

(DFG GL 327/4-3)

Since 2003

Reconstruction of ancient use of Terra Preta using molecular markers and compound-specific stable isotope ratios (d13C)

(DFG GL 327/5-1,2)

Since 2003

Soil biodiversity and soil sustainability in fragmental landscapes at the Atlantic Plateau of São Paulo (Brasil)

(BMBF)


  Project summaries

Properties and stability of soil organic matter in Red Indian Black Earths (Terra Preta) (DFG Gu 406/2-1,2)

 

Summary

Within the Oxisol and Ultisol landscape of the Brazilian Amazon region, patches of highly fertile and sustainably anthropogenic soils, known as Terra Preta occur. Terra Preta soils are characterised by a large and stable soil organic matter (SOM) pool and by high stocks of nutrients such as N, P, and Ca. These soils are favoured by the local farmers because of they enable high crop yields. The establishment of stable SOM seems to be decisive for the sustainable soil fertility. Frequent charcoal findings provided evidence that black carbon is responsible for the SOM stability in these soils. For this reason the main objective of the current work was to verify if and to which extent black carbon contributes to SOM of Terra Preta soils. Futhermore organo-mineral and physical stabilisation of SOM was investigated, accompanied by an assessment of labile SOM pools and N- and P-availability.

Black carbon was analysed in the fine-earth and in particle-size and density fractions of Terra Preta soils and surrounding Oxisols with a novel technique using benzenecarboxylic acids (BCA) as molecular markers for black carbon. The analytical procedure includes acid digestion, oxidation, sample cleanup, derivatization, and gas chromatography. BCA were not produced upon oxidation of model humic substances.

SOM of Terra Preta consists up to 35% of black carbon, which remains as residue after incomplete burning of biomass. Terra Preta (16 to 122 Mg ha-1 m-1) contains up to 35 times more black carbon than adjacent Oxisols (3 to 13 Mg ha-1 m-1). More than 50% of black carbon is located in the silt and clay fraction indicating organo-mineral complexation. An increase of the black carbon content in the clay fraction with increasing soil depth indicates leaching. Density fractionation, however, shows that the highest concentrations and absolute amounts of black carbon are located in the fraction < 2.0 g cm-3, even in 40 cm soil depth. This SOM fraction is assumed to be of particulate nature and corroborates the chemical and biological inertness of black carbon. This favours the theory of transport by turbation into deeper soil horizons. Another part of  black carbon is involved into organo-mineral complexation. This could be the reason for the high cation exchange capacities of Terra Preta soils, although particulate black carbon could be carboxylated also at the surface. A small part of black carbon is embedded within plaques on the surface of minerals, isolated with the heavy fraction. 

The high SOM levels in Terra Preta soils promote soil aggregation, which leads to higher physical protection of SOM in Terra Preta soils compared to surrounding Oxisol but contributes also higher labile SOM, resulting in higher mineralization rates in Terra Preta soils.

Terra Preta soils contain 2 to 3 times higher N stocks than adjacent Oxisols. In all soils, N is predominantly associated with the clay fraction and is mineralised more slowly but more continuously in Terra Preta soils indicating a more sustainable N supply than in the Oxisols. By means of wet chemical analysis in both soil types only 30% of total N could be identified, which consisted of 18 to 25% amino acid N, 4 to 7% amino sugar N and 1 to 2 % inorganic N.

P stocks are 4 to 5 times higher in Terra Preta soils compared to surrounding Oxisols, which affect the immediately available but also the more stable and resistant P pools. A predominance of inorganic P indicates fixation to iron and aluminium oxides. A low contribution of diester-P provide evidence of high mineralisation rates both in Terra Preta soils and Oxisols. Organic P was dominated by monoester-P, which is predominantly fixed to iron and aluminium oxides.

A key factor for the genesis of Terra Preta is the input of large amounts of black carbon, which improves sustainably the SOM quality by providing a higher cation exchange capacity. The higher stocks of N, P, and Ca are probably due to human excrements and biomass accumulation from the surroundings. The mineralized nutrients could be stored sustainably. Higher biomass production on Terra Preta soils still result in higher C and N inputs into the topsoil.

 

Publications

  1. Glaser B., Lehmann J., Zech W. (2002) Ameliorating physical and chemical properties of highly weathered soils in the tropics with charcoal – a review. Biology and Fertility of Soils 35, 219-230.

  2. Lehmann Johannes, da Silva Jose Pereira, Rondon Marco, da Silva Cravo Manoel, Greenwood Jacqueline, Nehls Thomas, Steiner Christoph, Glaser Bruno (2002)
    Slash-and-char – a feasible alternative for soil fertility management in the central Amazon? Paper, presented at the ISSS Conference, Bangkok, Thailand pp. 1-12.

  3. Bethge P. (2002)
    Plantagen am Fluss - Ist der Dschungel am Amazonas gar kein Urwald? Der Spiegel 14, 190-191.

  4. Glaser B., Guggenberger G., Zech W. (2001)
    Black carbon in sustainable soils of the Brazilian Amazon region. In Understanding & Managing Organic Matter in Soils, Sediments & Waters. R. S. Swift,K. M. Spark, (Eds.), International Humic Substances Society, St. Paul, MN pp. 359-364.

  5. Glaser B., Guggenberger G., Zech W. (2001)
    Persistence of soil orgnic matter in archaeological soils (Terra Preta) of the Brazilian Amazon region. In Sustainable Management of Soil Organic Matter. R. M. Rees, B. C. Ball, C. D. Campbell,C. A. Watson, (Eds.), CAB International, Wallingford, UK pp. 190-194.

  6. Glaser B., Haumaier L., Guggenberger G., Zech W. (2001) The Terra Preta Phenomenon - a model for sustainable agriculture in the humid tropics. Naturwissenschaften, 88: 37 - 41.

  7. Glaser B., Haumaier L., Guggenberger G., Zech W.  (2001)
    El fénomeno de Terra Preta - un modelo para una agricultura sostenible en países tropicales. SAB 2001. Arqueologia no novo milenio. S 62 – 63. XI congresso da sociedade de arqueologia brasileira. Hotel lplaza Copacabana 23 a 29 de setembro de 2001, Brasil.

  8. Pearce F. (2001)
    Burn it down - Setting fire to small patches of rainforest may do more good than harm. The New Scientist 10 February, 15.

  9. Glaser B., Zech, W. (2000)
    Schlüssel zur Fruchtbarkeit der Indianerschwarzerden Amazoniens. SPEKTRUM, Informationszeitschrift der Universität Bayreuth 1: 35 – 36.

  10. Glaser B., Balashov E., Haumaier L., Guggenberger G., Zech W. (2000) Black carbon in density fractions of anthropogenic soils of the Brazilian Amazon region. Organic Geochemistry 31: 669 - 678.

  11. Glaser B. (1999)
    Eigenschaften und Stabilität des Humuskörpers der Indianerschwarzerden Amazoniens. Bayreuther Bodenkundliche Berichte 68, 196 pp. 

  12. Glaser B., Guggenberger G., Haumaier L., Zech W. (1999)
    Black carbon in Terra Preta soils of the Brazilian Amazon region. Proceedings of the Ninth Annual V. M. Goldschmidt Conference August 22 - 27, 1999, Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts. Editor: Lunar and Planetary Institute, LPI Contribution No. 971: 100.

  13. Glaser B., Haumaier L., Guggenberger G., Zech W. (1998) Black carbon in soils: The use of benzenecarboxylic acids as specific markers. Organic Geochemistry 29: 811 - 819.


Soil organic matter quantity and quality in mountain soils of the Alay Range, Kyrgyzia, affected by land use change

 

Summary

Changes in soil management practices influence the amount, quality and turnover of soil organic matter (SOM). Our objective was to study the effects of deforestation followed by pasture establishment on SOM quantity, quality and turnover in mountain soils of the Sui Checti valley in the Alay Range, Kyrgyzia. This objective was approached by analysis of total organic C (TOC), N, lignin-derived phenols, and neutral sugars in soil samples and primary particle-size separates. Pasture installation led to a loss of about 30% TOC compared to the native Juniperus turkestanica forests. The pasture soils accumulated about 20% N, due to inputs via animal excrements. Land use change from forest to pasture affected principally SOM bound to silt fraction, observing a higher microbial decomposition in pasture than in forest silt fraction, as indicated by lower yields of lignin and carbohydrates, but also by a more advanced oxidative lignin side chain oxidation and higher values of plant to microbial sugar ratios. The ratio of arabinose to xylose was characteristic for evaluating the replacement of carbohydrates of the original forest by pasture, and we conclude that it can be used as an indicator for deforestation. The accumulation of lignin and its low humification within the forest floor could be due to the extremely cold winter and dry summer climate.

Publications

  1. Turrión M.-B., Glaser B., Zech W. (2002) Deforestation effects on contents and dynamics of amino sugar in mountain soils. Biology and Fertility of Soils, 35: 49 - 53.

  2. Zech W., Glaser B., Ni A., Petrov M., Lemzin I. (2000) Soils as indicators of the Pleistocene and Holocene landscape evolution in the Alay Range (Kyrgystan). Quaternary International 65/66: 147 - 160. 

  3. Turrión M.-B., Glaser B., Solomon D., Ni A., Zech W. (2000) Effects of deforestation on phosphorus pools in mountain soils of the Alay Range, Khyrgyzia. Biology and Fertility of Soils 31: 134 - 142. 

  4. Glaser B., Turrión M.-B., Solomon D., Ni A., Zech W. (2000) Soil organic matter pools in mountain soils of the Alay Range, Kyrgyzia, affected by deforestation. Biology and Fertility of Soils 31: 407 - 413.

  5. Zech W., Glaser B., Turrión M.-B., Solomon D., Hailu G., Ni A., Petrov M., Lemzin I. (2000)
    Effects of deforestation on organic matter properties of mountain soils of the Alay Range, Kyrgyzia: a geoecological case study in High Asia.  In: G. Miehe, Y. Zhang (eds.), Environmental Changes in High Asia. Proc. Int. Symp., University of Marburg, Faculty of Geography, May 29 - June 1, 1997. Marburger Geographische Schriften 135, 83-93.


Reconstruction of the Late Quaternary Glaciation of the Macha Khola valley (Gorkha Himal, Nepal)

 

Summary

In order to reconstruct the late Quaternary glacier fluctuations in the Macha Khola valley (Gorkha Himal, Nepal), geomorphologic and pedologic studies were undertaken. According to the geomorphologic situation, four moraine complexes could be identified. With respect to the results of radiocarbon analyses and relative dating techniques, these moraines indicate historical (< 1,7 Ka BP), Neoglacial (5,5-1,7 Ka BP), Late Glacial (17-10 Ka BP), and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 17/18 - 60? Ka BP) glacier advances. No relics of Middle or Early Pleistocene glaciations were found. The LGM glacier advanced to an altitude of at least 2150 m a.s.l. corresponding to an ELA depression of approximately 1300 m. It remains unclear  whether the maximum of the Late Pleistocene glaciation occurred during Oxygen Isotope Stage 4 or 2. Our results show that the LGM Macha Khola glacier retreated some time before 15 Ka BP. Between the retreat and 15 Ka BP the vegetation probably consisted of C4 tundra grasses as indicated by d13C values of about –15 ‰. During the Late Glacial the Macha Khola glacier descended to altitudes between 2450 m and 3400 m a.s.l. After ca. 15 Ka BP, the d13C values decreased to about –25 to - 28 ‰ indicating reforestation. The Neoglacial ice advances were much stronger than the historical ones. Dendrochronological data of Abies spectabilis suggested several periods of unfavourable growth conditions which were especially pronounced around 1820 and at the beginning of the 20th century

Publications

  1. Glaser B., Schmitt, J., Zech W. (2003)
    Late Glacial and Holocene evolution of a high mountain lake catchment in the Gokha Himal, Nepal deduced from biomarker and stable isotope analysis, in review.

  2. Zech W., Glaser B., Abramowski U., Dittmar C., Kubik P.W. (2003) Reconstruction of the late Quaternary Glaciation of the Macha Khola valley (Gorkha Himal, Nepal) using relative and absolute (14C, 10Be, dendrochronology) dating techniques. Quaternary Science Reviews, 22, 2253-2265.


Compound-specific stable isotope ratios of soil organic matter (Ze 154/46-1)

 

Summary

The motivation for the determination of compound specific isotope ratios in soil organic matter is based on the fact that in soils and their chemical and physical fractions many different organic substrates for microbes exist. The analysis of stable carbon isotopes (12C, 13C) of such bulk samples results in a mean isotopic signal (d13C) which does not allow a differentiation between labile and stable carbon in organic compounds. To differentiate between differently available C-sources or to recognize specific pathways for the heterotrophic use of these sources, the compound specific analysis of the d13C ratio by means of gas chromatography - combustion - isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is necessary. Our approach is based on the analysis of the d13C ratio of biomarkers such as lignin phenols, amino acids, amino sugars and benzenecarboxylic acids in soil samples and their physical fractions. In this project we adapted methods developed at the Bayreuth Institute of Soil Science and Soil Geography for the quantification of the above mentioned biomarkers for the analysis of compound specific isotope ratios by means of GC-C-IRMS and identified and eliminated method induced isotope discriminations. 

Publications

  1. Glaser B., Amelung W. (2002) Determination of 13C natural abundance of amino acid enantiomers in soil: methodological considerations and firest results. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 16: 891 - 898. 

  2. Glaser, B., Rodionov, A., Zech, W. (2002)
    Origin of pyrogenic carbon in mollisols as assessed by 13C natural abundance of benzenecarboxylic acids. Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society 223, 009-GEOC Part 1 April 7 2002.

  3. Glaser B., Bol R., Amelung W., Preedy N., Zech W. (2001) Short-term sequestration of slurry-derived carbon and nitrogen in temperate grassland soil using d13C and d15N natural abundance. Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, 164: 467 - 474.

  4. Glaser B., Amelung W. (2001)
    Methodological investigations on d13C analysis of amino acid enantiomers with GC-C-IRMS and application in soil science. Abstract of papers of the American Chemical Society 221: 111.

  5. Moering J., Glaser B., Bol R., Amelung W., Preedy N., McTiernan K. (2001)
    Tracing the incorporation of slurry-derived C into soil particle-size fractions of a temperatue grassland using 13C natural abundance. Paper presented at the annual workshop of the UK Stable Isotope Mass Spectrometry User´s Group (SIMSUG), 16 - 17 January 2001, Glasgow, UK. 

  6. Glaser B., Bol R., Amelung W., Preedy N., Zech W. (2000)
    Quantifizierung von Güllebürtigem C und N in einem Graslandboden mittels natürlicher 13C und 15N Isotopenhäufigkeiten. Paper presented at the 22. Jahrestagung der Arbeitsgemeinschaft Stabile Isotope e. V. (ASI 2000), 4. bis 6. Oktober 2000, Leipzig, Germany. Isotopes in Environmental and Health Studies 36: 353 - 373.


Evaluation of soil genesis and soil fertility of the Pamir mountains, Tajikistan (GL XY)

 

Summary

The aims of this project are to evaluate a detailed chronology of the Holocene and Pleistocene climate fluctuations  in the surroundings of the Fedschenko glacier, the largest glacier of Eurasia by means of soil genetic properties, relative (weathering indices, clay mineralogy) and absolute dating (radiocarbon, cosmogenic nuclides). Additionally, potential and limitation of land-use of the Pamir mountains will be evaluated with special emphasis to agriculture and pasture. This will be achieved by establishing soil maps with general soil fertility parameters as well as nutrient contents of plants and nutrient delivery potential of soil organic matter.

Publications

  1. Glaser B., Turrión M.-B., Zech W. (2001)
    Consequences of forest clearing for soil organic properties in high mountain soils. Invited lecture at the International conference „The development of Mountainous Regions of Central Asia in XXI century“ organzied by the Pamir Biology Institute and the University of Chorog due to the 10th anniversary of the Tajik independence, 24 - 26 August, Chorog, Tajikistan. Abstract book 93 - 94.

Assessing turnover rates of soil organic matter by means of compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios (d13C) (GL 327/4-3)

 

Summary

The aim of this project is the assessment of turnover rates of soil organic matterconstituents by means of compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratio determination (d13C) using Gas Chromatography - Combustion - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). In a former project-phase, well established analytical methods for biomarker determination such as lignin, amino acids, benzenepolycarboxylic acids) were optimized for GC-C-IRMS analysis and method-induced isotope fractionation identified and eliminated. In the current project period, special emphasis is made to microbial biomarkers such as phospholipid fatty acids, amino sugars and neutral sugars. A main focus lies on further method optimization, especially the reduction of the foreign-carbon addition during derivatization. The optimized GC-C-IRMS methods will be applied to a set of different experiments working with artificial and natural isotope labeling such as agricultural soils incubated with labeled glucose under controlled conditions, C3 grassland soils incubated with maize slurry in the field. Furthermore, the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on soil organic matter turnover will be evaluated using the Zurich Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment facility. 

 

Publications

  1. Millar, N., Blum, H., Lobe, I., Glaser, B. (2004)
    The effect of long-term elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil amino sugars in ryegrass swards. In: Grassland Science in Europe, 9. European Grassland Federation.

  2. Glaser, B., Frey, S.D., Millar, N., Six, J., Guggenberger, G., Zech, W., (2003)
    Differentiating between old and new microbially-derived soil organic matter by means of compound specific stable isotope (
    d13C) analysis. In: 225th ACS International Meeting March 23-27
    pp. 70-Tech. American Chemical Society, New Orleans, Louisiana.

  3. Glaser, B., Turrión, M.-B., Alef, K., (2003)
    Amino sugars and muramic acid - Biomarkers for soil microbial community structure analysis. Soil Biology & Biochemistry, in press.

  4. Bol R., Moering, J., Preedy N., Glaser, B. (2003)
    Short-term sequestration of slurry-derived carbon into particle size fractions of a temperate grassland soil. Isotopes in Environmental and Health Studies, in press.

  5. Bol R., Kandeler, E., Amelung, W. Glaser, B., Marx, M.C., Preedy N., Lorenz, K. (2003)
    Short-term effects of dairy slurry amendment on carbon sequestration and enyzme activities in a temperate grassland. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 35, 1411-1421.

  6. Makarov M.I., Glaser B.,  Zech W., Malysheva T.I., Bulatnikova I.V., Volkov A.V. (2003) Nitrogen dynamics in alpine ecosystems of the northern Caucasus. Plant and Soil, 256, 389-402.
    Schmitt J., Glaser B., Zech W. (2003) Amount dependent isotopic fractionation during compound-specific isotope analysis. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 17, 970-977.

  7. Kalbitz K., Schwesig D., Schmerwitz J., Kaiser K., Haumaier L., Glaser B., Ellerbrock R., Leinweber P. (2003) Changes in properties of soil-derived dissolved organic matter induced by biodegradation. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 35: 1129-1142.

  8. Kalbitz K., Schwesig D., Schmerwitz J., Glaser B., Ellerbrock R., Leinweber P. (2002)
    Properties of dissolved organic matter rlated to the dynamics of its biodegradation. Paper presented at the IHSS Conference, Boston, July 22-26,2002.


Reconstruction of ancient use of Terra Preta using molecular markers and compound-specific stable isotope ratios (d13C) (GL 327/5-1,2)

 

Summary

In Amazonia, nutrient-poor Oxisols and Ultisols predominate which are hardly usable in a sustainable way. However, within this landscape, a mosaic of highly fertile soils occur, known as Terra Preta (do Indio), which are the product of sustainable land management of pre-Columbian Indians. Our previous examinations showed that the high and stable soil organic matter stocks of these soils were decisively attributed to pyrogenen carbon. However, input of nutrient-poor charred residues does not explain the high nutrient contents (particular N, P, about, Mg) of Terra Preta soils. Thus, the goal of the present research project is it therefore, to gain insight into pre-Columbian land-use through small-scale analysis of different phosphorus forms, stable biomarkers and their stable isotope ratios. Especially, one should distinguish between the entry of human and animal excrements as well as between aquatic and terrestrial biomass. From the results of this research, we expect information on the enrichment of Terra Preta with nutrients as well as the heterogeneity of the entry-paths.

 

Publications

  1. Glaser B., Woods, W. (2004) Amazônian Dark Earths: Explorations in Space and Time. Springer, Heidelberg, 250 pp, in press. 

  2. Lehmann, J., Kern, D., Glaser, B., Woods, W. (2004) Amazônian Dark Earths: Origin, Properties, and Management. Kluwer, in press.

  3. Glaser B., Guggenberger G., Zech W. (2004)
    Past anthropogenic influence on the present soil properties of anthropogenic dark earths (Terra Preta) in Amazonia (Brazil). In: Glaser, B., Woods, W. (Eds.) Amazônian Dark Earths. Springer, Heidelberg, 250 pp, in press. 

  4. Glaser B., Zech W. (2004)
    History, current knowledge and future perspectives of geoecological research concerning the origin of Amazonian anthropogenic dark earths (Terra Preta). In: Glaser, B., Woods, W. (Eds.) Amazônian Dark Earths. Springer, Heidelberg, 250 pp, in press.

  5. Glaser B., Woods, W. (2004)
    Organic chemistry studies on Amaônian Dark Earths. In: Lehmann, J., Kern, D., Glaser, B., Woods, W. (Eds.) Amazônian Dark Earths: Origin, Properties, and Management. Kluwer, in press. 

  6. Glaser B., Guggenberger G., Zech W., Ruivo M.L. (2004)
    Soil organic matter stability in Amazônian Dark Earths. In: Lehmann, J., Kern, D., Glaser, B., Woods, W. (Eds.) Amazônian Dark Earths: Origin, Properties, and Management. Kluwer, in press

  7. Sombroek, W., Ruivo, M.D.L., Fearnside, P.M., Glaser, B., Lehmann, J. (2004)
    Anthropogenic Dark Earths as carbon stores and sinks. In: Lehmann, J., Kern, D., Glaser, B., Woods, W. (Eds.) Amazônian Dark Earths: Origin, Properties, and Management. Kluwer, in press. 

  8. Glaser, B., Neves, E.G., Peterson, J.B., (2003) 
    Contribuição de análises de química orgânica e DNA para o entendimento da gênese das terras pretas da Amazônia Central. In: SAB XII Conference. Sociedade de Arqueologia Brasileira, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

  9. Glaser, B., Woods, W., (2003) 
    Molecular archaeometric methods and the origin of Amazonian Dark Earths: Possibilities and Limitations. In: 68th SAA Meeting, pp. 104. Society for American Archaeology, Milwaukee, WI.

  10. Glaser B. (2002)
    The long term memory of soils - how Amazonian dark earths reflect past land-use. European Tropical Forest Research Network (ETFRN) News 37, 25-27.

  11. Sombroek W., Kern D., Rodrigues T., da Silva Cravo M., Jarbas Cunha T., Woods W., Glaser B. (2002)
    Terra Preta and Terra Mulata: pre-Columbian Amazon kitchen middens and agricultural fields, their sustainability and their replication. Paper presented at the ISSS Conference, Bangkok, Thailand.

  12. Mann C.C. (2002)
    The real dirt on Rainforest fertility. Science 297, 922 - 923.


 
Soil biodiversity and soil sustainability in fragmental landscapes at the Atlantic Plateau of São Paulo (Brazil)

 

Summary

The objective of this project is to study the effects of fragmentation on 1) soil biodiversity (structure, function) and 2) soil sustainability. Both are closely correlated. In agreement with the Brazilian and German partners the following habitats, which are the result of fragmentation, will be compared: relics of primary forest, large fragments of secondary forests, small fragments of secondary forests, forest plantations, agricultural land, and hydromorphic sites. The research plots within these habitats will be characterised pedologically, thus contributing to the data bank on the regional abiotic conditions. The data on soil biodiversity and sustainability will be evaluated together with results of other subprojects, in order to model building, recommendations for management practices and land use planning in respect to biodiversity conservation.

 

Publications

  1. Zech, W., Barbosa, P. de Camargo, Glaser, B., Schramm, A., Ullrich, T., Bähr, E., Förster, M. Fiedler, S., Schreitmüller, I, Puzzi, P. (2003)
    Does fragmentation influence soil biodiversity and thus soil sustainability? Plans for a case study at the Atlantic Plateau of São Paulo (Brazil). In: Sustainable use and conservation of biological diversity. A challenge for society. Report International Symposium 1-4 December 2003, Berlin, 345.

 


  Last update 24/12/03